DES FILMS ENDE

experimental film | 01:49 min., HD, stereo

The experimental film ’Des Films Ende’ (engl. ’End of Film’) was realized without a camera. Transparent 16mm film was painted with acrylic paint, manipulated with chlorine and acid as well as scratched. The sound of the film is a cacophony of the sound of ‘real’ advertising clips in as many languages as there are continents. The sound ends in a melody of artifacts, emanating from amplifiers and loudspeakers.

With this project ’End of Film’ I wanted to address ‘moving image advertising’ on two levels: first of all, I wanted to investigate the language and formalism of ‘moving image advertising’. Of particular interest to me was the observation that commercials always sound the same – it does not matter which language you speak, you will most likely be able to identify the main message of the ad. I think the power of the image is the key in advertisement, thus with this project I wanted to focus on the sound element. I collected about 80 commercials from all over the world and in various languages. I arranged them into a cacophony until the composition is an artifact.


In addition, I wanted to question society’s visual consumption of ‘moving image advertising’. The stream of images in ’End of Film’ can be interpreted in two ways: on the one hand, it can be read as the flood of advertising to which we are exposed to. We are so overstimulated with it that we cannot really consciously consume it anymore. On the other hand, ’End of Film’ also plays with the visual mechanisms of ’moving image advertising’. The film shows fast moving forms and imagery that does not define anything in particular, it’s merely abstract. This stands in great contrast to the advertisement industry which works with explicit imagery, but at the same time ads do not directly address what their underlying aim is: to manipulate the viewer. ’End of Film’ confronts the viewer with this aspect: no film, just color. It’s only acrylic paint on transparent film, it has no obvious narrative. In this sense the film is a commercial you don’t see the underlying meaning at first glance.
— Sybille Bauer